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Michael Petruzzelli

, National Council for Behavioral Health

Obama Administration Awards Money to Fight Opioids, Fund PDMPs

September 1, 2016 | Opioid and Heroin Epidemic | Comments
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On Tuesday, the Obama administration announced the allocation of new grant funding to fight the nation’s growing opioid use and abuse epidemic. $53 million will be shared across 44 states and the District of Columbia to expand access to treatment, enhance data collection and curb abuse of opioid across the country. These grants will fund prescriber training and education, increase access to medication-assisted treatment and increase the prevalence of opioid overdose medications like Naloxone.

This new money includes $11.5 million from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help 14 states and the District of Columbia establish and expand prescription drug monitoring programs and $22 million through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to 20 states (see recipients below) to reduce overdose deaths and expand access to medication-assisted treatment. Further, $9 million will be allocated to SAMHSA to strengthen the drug misuse prevention efforts of 21 states (see below) and four tribes.  Additional grants awarded through the CDC and SAMHSA will cover other projects adhering to the strategy laid out by the administration.

“The epidemic of opioid use disorders involving the non-medical use of prescription opioid pain relievers and the use of heroin has had a devastating impact on individuals, families and communities across our nation,” said Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Principal Deputy Administrator Kana Enomoto. “These grants will help address the key elements of the opioid crisis by promoting effective prevention efforts, preventing overdose deaths and helping ensure that people with opioid use disorders are able to receive vital treatment and recovery support services.”

 

The awardees for these grants include:

  • The Medication-Assisted Treatment Prescription Drug Opioid Addiction Grants ($11 million): Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Louisiana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Rhode Island.
  • Prescription Drug Opioid Overdose Prevention Grants ($11 million): Alaska, Arkansas, Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.
  • Strategic Prevention Framework Partnerships for Prescription Drugs Grants ($9 million): Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin as well as Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Cherokee Nation, Southern Plains Tribal Health Board, and the Nooksack Indian Tribe.
  • The Prescription Drug Overdose: Prevention for States program ($11.5 million): California, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin.
  • Prescription Drug Overdose: Data-Driven Prevention Initiative (DDPI) ($6 million): Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Jersey, South Dakota, and Washington, D.C.
  • Enhanced State Surveillance of Opioid-Involved Morbidity and Mortality ($4.27 million): Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.