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Archive: Medicaid

Capitol Connector
Your source for the latest updates from Capitol Hill. We translate policy into practice so you can learn how policy trends will affect your work and how best to prepare.

Congress Extends CCBHC Demonstration in Oregon, Oklahoma

Michael Petruzzelli

, National Council for Behavioral Health

The Senate approved a bill by voice vote on Tuesday that extends the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) demonstration program in Oregon and Oklahoma, among other Medicaid programs. H.R. 1839, which passed the House last week, provides both states with an additional three months of participation in the CCBHC initiative, funding them both through June 30, 2019. Oregon and Oklahoma were set to conclude their two-year demonstration and lose their funding on March 31, but this extension will align them with the other six CCBHC demonstration states that began the program three months after OR and OK in 2017.

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New Report Details How Opioid Crisis Funds Are Being Used

Katiri Zuluaga

Manager, State Initiatives

The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) has published the first comprehensive report reviewing the estimated $11 billion allocated by the federal government for 57 different federal programs to address the opioid epidemic in 2017 and 2018. Funding has been used for a wide array of state-based programs, but states have primarily focused on creating treatment networks for opioid use disorder (OUD), financing treatment for at-risk individuals, making naloxone accessible and bolstering the addiction workforce. Unsurprisingly, the report found that Medicaid and Medicaid expansion have been critical in addressing the opioid epidemic. BPC recommends the federal government focus on sustainability, transparency, improved coordination among federal offices, and increased flexibility for states to address their unique needs.

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CMS Releases Guidance on Work Requirement Waivers

March 21, 2019 | Medicaid | Waivers/SPAs | Comments

Shelley Starkey

Policy & Advocacy Coordinator

The Trump Administration this week continued encouraging states to weave work requirements into their Medicaid programs by releasing guidance on implementing, monitoring, and evaluating such changes. The new tools from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are meant to provide guidance on creating effective demonstrations under Medicaid waiver authorities, particularly for waivers permitting states to implement work requirements and other experimental eligibility and coverage policies. As the Administration moves toward approving such waivers in more states, the National Council remains vehemently opposed to these harmful policies as they restrict access to needed mental health and addiction services.

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Ohio Becomes 9th State to Receive Approval for Medicaid Work Requirements

March 21, 2019 | Medicaid | Waivers/SPAs | Comments

Katiri Zuluaga

Manager, State Initiatives

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved Ohio’s Medicaid waiver to enact work requirements, even with legal challenges still pending in Kentucky and Arkansas for similar programs. Starting in 2021, Medicaid beneficiaries in Ohio not meeting certain exemptions will need to report 80 hours of “community engagement” per month to maintain coverage. Estimates indicate that approximately 18,000 people, about half of all eligible Medicaid beneficiaries, could lose coverage due to these new work requirements. The National Council for Behavioral Health remains strongly opposed to work requirements and other barriers that restrict access to needed behavioral health services.

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President Trump Releases FY 2020 Budget Proposal

March 15, 2019 | Federal Budget | Medicaid | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

On Monday, President Trump unveiled his Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 budget request — calling for $4.7 trillion decrease in federal spending and detailing his Administration’s priorities for next year. The document revives efforts to block grant Medicaid and restrict eligibility, maintains spending to combat opioid addiction, and outlines other major health care priorities. As with most presidential budgets, this proposal stands little chance of being enacted into law as written. Instead, the President’s budget proposal will act more as a messaging tool to Congress, which is currently working to develop and pass a budget for FY 2020 over the next few months

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Tonko, Turner Reintroduce Bipartisan Addiction Treatment Bill

March 8, 2019 | Justice | Medicaid | Comments

Shelley Starkey

Policy & Advocacy Coordinator

A bipartisan bill that would allow states to restart Medicaid coverage for eligible incarcerated individuals up to 30 days before their release from jail or prison was introduced this week by Representatives Paul Tonko (D-NY) and Michael Turner (R-OH). The Medicaid Reentry Act (H.R. 1329) is an important step toward improving access to much-needed mental health and substance use services for one of the most vulnerable populations in the country.

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National Council Urges CMS to Strengthen Network Adequacy Standards for Medicaid Managed Care

January 17, 2019 | Medicaid | Comments

Rebecca Farley David

Vice President, Policy & Advocacy

State Medicaid programs should work with managed care organizations to ensure beneficiaries have timely access to robust provider networks, the National Council urged the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in comments submitted Monday. Our comments were submitted in response to a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking issued by CMS in November that proposed to roll back prior regulations on Medicaid and CHIP managed care. While CMS indicated the new proposed rules are intended to “increase state flexibility,” the National Council is concerned they would result in loss of access to mental health and addiction treatment providers.

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Trump Administration Approves Medicaid Work Requirements in Maine, Michigan

January 3, 2019 | Medicaid | Waivers/SPAs | Comments

Shelley Starkey

Policy & Advocacy Coordinator

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved waivers from Michigan and Maine last month that would allow the states to implement requirements for Medicaid enrollees to report work or “community engagement” activities each month or risk losing health coverage. Michigan and Maine join five other states that have had Medicaid work requirement waivers approved, while more than ten others are in the process of requesting similar changes to their Medicaid programs. The National Council stands strongly opposed to any provisions that create barriers to health coverage for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, including Medicaid work requirements.

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CMS Urges Efforts to Improve Care for Dually Eligible Population

January 3, 2019 | Medicaid | Medicare | Quality | Comments

Michael Petruzzelli

, National Council for Behavioral Health

Late last month, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma sent a letter to state Medicaid directors describing ways states can improve care and reduce burdens for individuals who are dually-eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This population of individuals tends to have complex medical and behavioral health needs and accounts for a disproportionate share of federal spending for both programs. The letter outlines ten opportunities for states to improve care for the dually-eligible population in 2019.

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National Council Files Comments Against Public Charge Rule

December 13, 2018 | Medicaid | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

Last week, the National Council for Behavioral Health submitted comments to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regarding the Trump Administration’s proposed rule that would allow legal immigrants to be denied lawful permanent residency if they enroll in Medicaid or other public benefits. The proposed rule would expand the definition of “public charge,” a test that determines if immigrants are likely to become dependent on government for subsistence, to include federal health, housing and nutrition programs. The National Council expressed strong opposition to the rule as it would deter legal immigrant families from seeking health care coverage, harming the health of millions of adults and children.

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CCBHC Expiration Presents “A Looming Crisis” for Addiction Care

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

Since launching in mid-2017, Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHCs) have dramatically improved access to community-based addiction care in the eight states where they operate, particularly opioid addiction services. CCBHCs have hired hundreds of new addiction-focused clinicians, expanded medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and other addiction services, and reduced patient wait times. However, with the CCBHC program set to end in mid-2019, access to lifesaving treatment could be lost. A new National Council report shows that the end of the CCBHC demonstration would result in massive program closures, staff layoffs and reduced addiction treatment access for patients. The National Council is calling on Congress to act quickly to extend the life of this critical program.

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Law Enforcement & CCBHCs: Increasing Access to Treatment, Decreasing Recidivism

Shelley Starkey

Policy & Advocacy Coordinator

The National Council for Behavioral Health, in partnership with Senators Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and Roy Blunt (R-MO), hosted a Congressional staff briefing on Tuesday to highlight how Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHCs) are partnering with their local law enforcement to connect community members to timely addiction and mental health treatment and help officers to focus more of their time on their main duty: keeping their communities safe. The briefing brought together law enforcement officers and clinic leaders who urged Congress to act quickly to pass the Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act (S. 1905/H.R. 3931) to extend the CCBHC demonstration.

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Trump Administration Approves Kentucky Work Requirements for Second Time

November 29, 2018 | Medicaid | Waivers/SPAs | Comments

Shelley Starkey

Policy & Advocacy Coordinator

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) re-approved Kentucky’s request to add work requirements to the state’s Medicaid program last week, following a federal judge’s ruling earlier this year that overturned the first iteration of these requirements. These changes would require the population covered by Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion to report 80 hours of work or “work-related activities” each month, or face losing their coverage for a six-month lockout period. The approved 1115 waiver, which takes effect April 1, 2019, is almost identical to the state’s previously overturned application, and has been projected to result in at least 95,000 Kentuckians losing Medicaid coverage over the next five years.

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CMS Proposes Overhaul of Medicaid Managed Care Rules

November 16, 2018 | Medicaid | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has released a proposed rule to update the regulations governing Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care plans. The proposed rule would rollback many of the managed care standards established by the Obama Administration in 2016 that help ensure Medicaid beneficiaries have timely access to comprehensive health care. Now CMS intends to “increase state flexibility” by relaxing requirements that support network adequacy and provider pay. CMS is accepting comments on the proposed rule through January 14, 2019.

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CMS Announces New Opportunities to Expand Mental Health Services

November 15, 2018 | Medicaid | Mental Health | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

This week the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a new opportunity for states to expand Medicaid coverage for mental health services, including treatment delivered in inpatient facilities with more than 16 beds known as institutions for mental disease (IMDs). In a letter, CMS explains how states can use Section 1115 waivers to “support innovative service delivery systems” for adults with serious mental illness (SMI) and children with serious emotional disturbance (SED). CMS emphasized the need for states to bolster early identification services, better integrate mental health and primary care, increase access to crisis services and expand the use of Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHCs).

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Health Care Emerges as Top Issue in Midterms

November 8, 2018 | ACA | Medicaid | Mental Health | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

With historic levels of voter turnout, Tuesday’s midterm election results saw Democrats regain control of the House of Representatives, while Republicans strengthened their majority in the Senate. Health care emerged as a clear priority for voters and Medicaid expansion proved to be a big winner on election night. With power now divided in Congress, the next two years could feature intense political gridlock or force bipartisan compromise. Right now, one thing is clear – the 2018 midterms will send one of the largest classes of freshmen Members to Washington in recent history – and with them come new advocacy opportunities for the National Council and its members.

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Wisconsin Waiver Adds Medicaid Work Requirements, Drug Screens

November 1, 2018 | Medicaid | Waivers/SPAs | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

On Wednesday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Wisconsin’s request to enact a series of restrictions that would limit Medicaid eligibility and restrict enrollees’ use of Medicaid benefits. The newly-approved Section 1115 waiver will require certain adult beneficiaries to work 80 hours per month to maintain health coverage, institute premiums and subject applicants to drug use screening questions. This decision is the latest in a series of work requirement approvals, however, Wisconsin is the first non-Medicaid expansion state to receive permission from CMS to impose work requirements.

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Kaiser Family Foundation Survey Outlines Medicaid’s Future

November 1, 2018 | Medicaid | Comments

Shelley Starkey

Policy & Advocacy Coordinator

Results from a new survey suggest that state Medicaid programs have seen stagnant enrollment over the past year while combined federal and state spending continued to grow similarly to the previous year. Additionally, states have reported a shifting focus toward prioritizing improvements in outcomes and value through delivery system changes and managed care requirements. The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) and Health Management Associates (HMA) included these results from their 18th annual survey of state Medicaid directors in two reports, released last week.

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New Rule Would Limit Immigrants’ Medicaid Access

October 11, 2018 | Medicaid | Take Action | Comments

Stephanie Pasternak

Policy Associate, National Council for Behavioral Health

This week, the Trump Administration formally published a rule that would allow legal immigrants to be denied lawful permanent residency if they enroll in Medicaid or other public benefits. The proposed rule would expand the definition of “public charge,” a test that determines if immigrants are likely to become dependent on government for subsistence, to include federal health, housing and nutrition programs. The National Council strongly opposes the rule as it would deter immigrant families from seeking health care coverage, harming the health of millions of adults and children. The proposed rule is subject to a 60-day comment period, meaning comments on the rule will be accepted until December 10.

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National Council Submits Comments on Kentucky Medicaid Work Requirement

August 23, 2018 | Medicaid | Comments

Michael Petruzzelli

, National Council for Behavioral Health

Last week, the National Council submitted comments to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regarding Kentucky’s Medicaid proposal to impose work requirements on Medicaid beneficiaries. In July, a district court judge blocked the state’s waiver request and required the agency to reevaluate the waiver application and analyze its impact on beneficiaries. This legal decision only applies to Kentucky and has no bearings on work requirements being imposed in other states.

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