Start with Hope: How Providers Can Navigate Culturally Responsive Substance Use Treatment and Care

Finding substance use treatment resources is complex for those who identify as Black, African American, of African descent, Indigenous or Hispanic/Latinx because of experience of racism, oppression and historic marginalization. For centuries, the people of these communities have created ways to support each other and heal through culturally responsive approaches that prioritize the strengths, wisdom and insights of community members. In recent decades, harm reduction practices and shifting cultural stigmas about substance use and mental health have emerged as priorities among leaders, including health care providers, who are addressing healing from substance use challenges within their communities.   

Join Arc Telos “Tay” Saint Amour (Youth MOVE National), Tamara Oyola-Santiago (Bronx Movil) and Nyla Christian (Center for African American Recovery Development) on Thursday, June 27, 3-4:30 p.m. ET, for Start with Hope: How Providers Can Navigate Culturally Responsive Substance Use Treatment and Care. 

This webinar will explore considerations and resources for health care providers who are working with these communities and individuals seeking mental health and substance use support. 

  In this session, participants will:  

  • Discuss how overlapping identities and dimensions of diversity can impact an individual’s access to substance use treatment and care.  
  • Explore strategies to navigate cultural norms and stigmas about substance use and substance use treatment and care.  
  • Learn about harm reduction approaches in Black, African American, of African Descent, Indigenous and Hispanic/Latinx communities, including unique cultural considerations. 

About Start With Hope 

The National Council for Mental Wellbeing, in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Ad Council and Shatterproof, is inspiring millions with the “Start With Hope” campaign. This vital effort aims to deliver a message of hope to those living with substance use disorders (SUDs), as well as those at risk of developing an SUD, with a focus on reaching Black and Hispanic/Latinx populations, empowering them to start their journeys to wellbeing and recovery by learning about harm reduction strategies and treatment resources. 

This project is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $1,500,000 with 100% funded by CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, CDC/HHS or the U.S. government.