National Council for Mental Wellbeing

Skip to content National Council for Mental Wellbeing
Find a Provider
National Council for Mental Wellbeing logo
Nicotine Addiction, Mental Wellbeing & Recovery 101

Advancement of public health policies and practices over the past 50 years has been effective in reducing nicotine addiction and smoking among the general population; however, significant tobacco-related disparities still exist among individuals with mental health and substance use challenges.

Join the National Behavioral Health Network for Tobacco & Cancer Control on Thursday, October 21 from 12–1 p.m. ET for a conversation about strategies to address tobacco-related disparities and improve mental wellbeing and recovery for individuals with mental health and substance use challenges.

By joining this webinar, you will:

  • Learn ways in which tobacco control intersects with health equity.

  • Re-imagine ways to frame tobacco use in mental health, addiction and recovery.

  • Gain tools to enhance tobacco control and cessation efforts.

CoE Office Hour: Resources & Tools for Advancing Rural Health Equity through Integrated Care

Rural, agricultural and tribal communities face a particular set of health inequities that are not as common in urban areas, due to several factors including historical injustices, structural urbanism and the effects of the mental health and recovery services workforce shortage on access to rural health services.

To advance health equity in underserved rural communities, it is important to recognize both systemic challenges and advantages that exist in rural areas, especially during COVID-19, as well as the social influences that shape rural health outcomes. Advancing integrated care in rural areas has the potential to not only improve access to comprehensive services, but also improve health equity and social determinants of health in rural areas.

Join us on Wednesday, October 20 from 2-3 p.m. ET for a conversation with rural health experts who will discuss innovative integrated care opportunities and share helpful tools and resources for advancing integrated care in rural communities. We will also share and discuss an upcoming ECHO opportunity that will provide peer-to-peer learning and open discussions among a group of rural health provider organizations committed to improving rural health equity.

CoE Office Hour: Supporting the Wellbeing of LGBTQ+ Clients and Staff: Intersectional and Affirming Strategies

Due to historic marginalization and discrimination, LGBTQ+ individuals face health disparities and challenges in accessing inclusive healthcare. Individuals who identify as LGBTQ+ are more likely to report chronic physical health conditions, as well as experience mental health and substance use challenges at higher rates. It is important to provide equitable mental health and recovery services to persons who identify as LGBTQ+ and foster engaging environments for staff where they feel connected and understood. Staff and providers must understand and affirm a wide array of other identities that also overlap for LGBTQ+ individuals and populations, including those who also identify as Black, Indigenous and persons of color (BIPOC), persons with disabilities, persons who primarily speak languages other than English, and other identities.

 

Join us on Tuesday, October 19th from 2-3pm ET for a conversation with health equity and racial justice experts to hear about systemic challenges LGBTQ+ persons with intersecting identities face in healthcare and as staff in healthcare organizations. Experts will also discuss strategies to provide affirming supports for clients and staff who identify as LGBTQ+ in addition to their  intersecting identities.

Strategies for Complying with New ONC Data Sharing Rules, Including Collaborative Documentation

Providers are just beginning to grapple with new rules that shift the way the healthcare system shares data – moving from a system where healthcare organizations may share data under HIPAA to one where they must share data. New rules outlined in the 21st Century Cures Act (Act) and by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) at the Department of Health and Human Services took effect on April 5, 2021 that, among other things, allow patients to access information in their patient record, including clinical or medical notes prepared by the provider. Additional changes will take effect in 2022 and 2023.

Most providers will need to rethink the way they approach documentation. And these new rules may be the perfect opportunity to implement Collaborative Documentation, an approach that allows clinicians to document the clinical record with the patient present and contributing to the process. The results extend far beyond the record itself too often include improved client engagement, reduced no/show cancellations, improved medication adherence and enhanced quality of clinician work life.

Joe Parks, MD and Vice President of Practice Improvement and Medical Director for the National Council provided an overview of the current and new rules.

Michael Flora, Senior Management and Operations Consultant at MTM Services and an expert on Collaborative Documentation, reviewed clinical strategies for maximizing the opportunity presented by the new rules.

Valerie Westhead, MD MTM Services’ Medical Operations Consultant, offered guidance for prescribers.

Childhood Trauma: COVID-19 & Beyond

The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has taken an immense toll on entire school communities including School-Based Health Centers, mental health and substance use providers, educators, staff, students, and families. In collaboration with the National Council for Mental Wellbeing, the Weitzman Institute will kick off a Childhood Trauma ECHO series with a webinar. This webinar will acknowledge updates from the integrated care field and explore trauma and its impact on youth, families, schools, and providers to assist participants with putting plans into motion to leverage today’s resources. During this session, we will launch an opportunity to participate in the Weitzman ECHO Childhood Trauma series, aimed at peer-to-peer learning to enhance the understanding of childhood trauma among integrated care providers.

This webinar and Childhood Trauma ECHO series will be hosted by our partner, the Weitzman Institute. Join us on Tuesday, October 5 from 1-2pm ET for the Childhood Trauma webinar and consider signing up for the 22-session interactive ECHO series launching on Friday, October 8th from 12-1pm ET to join the learning community if you’re ready to take a deeper dive and contribute to smaller-group discussion! The extended ECHO series will consist of brief didactic presentations on key issues followed by real patient cases with actionable recommendations.

CoE Office Hour: SBIRT with Adults

To address the worsening substance use and overdose crisis in the United States, SBIRT can be used a paradigm shift in early intervention and treatment for substance use among adults. Join us for our follow-up office hour session on Thursday, September 30, from 3:00-4:00pm ET to continue the conversation and learn from integrated care experts who will explore SBIRT components, trends in substance use challenges among adults, and identify considerations for integration within the clinical workflow.

Screening, Brief Intervention & Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) with Adults: Implications for Integrated Care Settings

The utilization of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) approach, developed by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), has been effective in the delivery of early intervention and treatment to people who existing –or at risk for– substance use challenges and disorders. SBIRT, a comprehensive integrated public health model, routinely screens for potential medical problems, provides preventative services prior to the onset of acute symptoms, and delays or precludes the development of chronic conditions. To address the worsening substance use and overdose crisis in the United States, SBIRT can be used a paradigm shift in early intervention and treatment for substance use among adults. This webinar will explore the components of SBIRT, application of SBIRT for adults, considerations for integration, and building sustainability.

Join us for our webinar, Screening, Brief Intervention & Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) with Adults, on Tuesday, September 28, from 3:00-4:00pm ET to hear from integrated care experts who will explore SBIRT components, trends in substance use challenges among adults, and identify considerations for integration within the clinical workflow.

CoE Office Hour: SBIRT with Youth – Implications for Integrated Care Settings

YSBIRT better equips primary care organizations with necessary resources and tools to reduce adolescent substance use by educating their patients, identifying risky behaviors, and intervening early.

Join us for our follow-up office hour session on Thursday, September 23, from 3:00-4:00pm ET to continue the conversation and learn from integrated care experts who will explore SBIRT components, benefits of using this approach for youth, and social and cultural considerations.

Southeast CCBHC Learning Community

The Southeast Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, in collaboration with the National Council for Mental Wellbeing CCBHC Success Center, invites community mental health centers, behavioral health associations, state leaders and policymakers from the region to participate in a Southeast CCBHC Learning Community. This Learning Community will focus on orienting participants to the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) model, highlighting the impact of the program to date, and identifying considerations for implementation and sustainability of the model.

The Southeast CCBHC Learning Community will consist of six virtual learning sessions and six technical assistance/coaching sessions, occurring each week for a total of 12 weeks between Thursday, September 23 and Thursday, December 16, 2021 | 12:00 – 1:00 PM (ET). Visit their website to submit an application.

CoE Office Hour: Workforce Shortages & Impact on Providers and Staff Who Are Black, Indigenous, and Persons of Color, or Caregivers

At a time when the mental health and substance use recovery field is facing a major workforce shortage and mental health needs increase across the country, organizations and leaders must consider equity now more than ever. Equitable approaches must be taken to prevent compassion fatigue, burnout, and promote staff retention and recruitment, especially among providers of diverse backgrounds and identities. To address rising mental health and recovery services needs, organizations are also considering the specific experiences of those most impacted by the pandemic, including racially and ethnically diverse populations and caregivers at home. 

Join us on Wednesday, September 22nd, from 2-3pm ET for a conversation with health equity and racial justice experts for a conversation on equity considerations during a time of workforce shortages and increased mental wellbeing needs. Experts will discuss context around the current workforce shortage and increased mental wellbeing needs, as well as strategies to address the workforce shortage, and efforts to recruit providers of diverse identities and backgrounds.

1 2 3 4 5 6 10